Handmade chains

Handmade copper chain
Handmade copper chain

I love making my own chains. I have been hovered over images of ancient jewelry for hours,  checking out the techniques used. I love how I can find ideas and inspiration in something created and used thousands of years ago. I love the flow of the wire, and the feeling that I am really creating something that is handmade by me. I am always checking out new ways of making chains.

However, using a handmade chain defines the style very much . Forget tiny and dainty,  that requires tool I do not have.  If I think a piece requires a more dainty chain I need to use a fabricated one.

The problem for me then becomes : In what way can I now state that what I have made is handmade? A chain is such a large part of a necklace. I know many do call the hand-assembling in such a case for handmade. I would like to be upfront about it  so I call it ->designed and assembled.

There is still this need to actually give people something real.  After all , it was this terrible disappointment that made me start creating jewelry in the first place.  When I realized what I had bought as handmade was indeed not handmade.  So, perhaps I make the clasp, or the pendant in a neat wire wrap.  I do however feel a need to create more dainty things in the coming months. I have to find my way of adding that handmade touch for sure.

Handmade bronze chain
Handmade bronze chain

 

Time travel

In Trier, the German city – stands this large roman city gate build from 186 AD to 200 AD. It is called Porta Nigra. It is named such because of the darkened colour of the stones Wikipedia tells me.

The summer before I headed off to the Norwegian equivalent of high school, I was travelling with my mother in Germany. My sister had married there – and we spent a few weeks travelling the land, and would eventually end up at her place. On our trip, we came to this city – Trier. And I stood before this huge black gate.  Almost 2000 years old, it still stood there – defying time and decay. Monstrous. Huge.

Looking up at this amazing construction, I felt what only can be described as a gust of time. Literally. Something so old, and so rich in  history, it was almost beyond my comprehension.  I have experienced such moments later. At Akropolis , and at Knossos.

Sometimes I think it`s the closest we as humans can get to time travel. It is like we stand at a border, gazing into a time portal. Close to it, and yet so far away. This was the first time for me, and I was mesmerized. 40 years later – I can still feel it.

Thing is – when I have made that viking weave, patinated it, and working on it with some steel wool – I get that same feeling.

 

Viking weave with thulite
Viking weave with thulite